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MAJORITY WHIPLINE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2021

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House Meets at… Votes Predicted at…
12:00 p.m. Legislative Business
Fifteen “One Minutes” per side
First/Last Votes: 3:45 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.

 

ANY ANTICIPATED MEMBER ABSENCES FOR VOTES TODAY SHOULD BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY TO THE OFFICE OF THE MAJORITY WHIP AT 6-3210.

Floor Schedule and Procedure:

Complete Consideration of H.R. 1333 – NO BAN Act (Rep. Chu – Judiciary)

This bill prevents executive overreach by prohibiting the president from abusing his authority to restrict the entry of non-citizens into the United States, under section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

 

This bill provides a check on the President’s authority by requiring that any suspension or restriction is based on specific and credible facts, is narrowly tailored, specifies a duration, and includes waivers. Additionally, the bill expands the Immigration and Nationality Act’s nondiscrimination provision to prohibit discrimination based on religion and extends the prohibition on discrimination beyond the issuance of immigrant visas to include the issuance of nonimmigrant visas, entry and admission into the United States, and the approval or revocation of any immigration benefit.

 

Last Congress this legislation included a provision repealing the Trump Administration’s Muslim Bans, however, because President Biden rescinded the bans it is no longer necessary to repeal them through this legislation.  As a result a very similar version of this bill passed the House in the previous Congress.

 

Click here for bill text.

 

Click here for a two-pager from the Judiciary Committee.

 

Click here a section-by-section from the Judiciary Committee.

The Rule provides for one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Judiciary.

Complete Consideration of H.R. 1573 – Access to Counsel Act of 2021 (Rep. Jayapal – Judiciary)

This bill ensures that certain individuals who are subjected to prolonged inspection by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at ports of entry have a meaningful opportunity to communicate with counsel and other interested parties.

 

The bill would apply to individuals who are required to undergo extended processing in secondary or deferred inspection, specifically those individuals with U.S. passports (U.S. citizens), returning permanent residents, individuals with valid visas or other travel documents, and refugees and returning asylees.  The bill would permit these individuals to communicate with counsel and other interested parties if held in the secondary inspection for at least one hour.  The bill gives DHS and CBP discretion to determine how the consultation takes place and also provides additional protections for lawful permanent residents (LPRs) by prohibiting DHS from accepting a Record of Abandonment of Lawful Permanent Resident Status from an LPR without first providing the LPR a reasonable opportunity to consult with counsel.

 

The same version of this bill, with small technical changes, passed the House in the previous Congress.

 

Click here for bill text.

 

Click here for a two-pager from the Judiciary Committee.

 

Click here for a section-by-section from the Judiciary Committee.

The Rule provides for one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Judiciary.

Suspension (1 bill)

  1. H.R. 2630 – Extending Temporary Emergency Scheduling of Fentanyl Analogues Act, as amended (Rep. Pappas – Energy and Commerce)

    This bill would extend temporarily the emergency scheduling of fentanyl-related substance until October 22.  In response to rising rates of fentanyl overdoses and use, DEA used its authority in 2018 to temporarily place fentanyl-related substances in Schedule I, subjecting these substances to Schedule I regulatory requirements. Congress approved an extension of DEA’s emergency scheduling authority in February 2020. This authority is set to expire on May 6, 2021.

Postponed Suspension (1 vote)

1. H.R. 1392 – Protection of Saudi Dissidents Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. Connolly – Foreign Affairs)

This bill prevents U.S. involvement or complicity in Saudi attacks against Saudi dissidents, while ensuring necessary U.S. – Saudi cooperation continues. If Saudi intelligence or internal security are found to be involved in forced repatriation, silencing, or killing of dissidents in other countries, those agencies are barred from U.S. provided weapons. The bill also requires a report on if the intelligence community fulfilled their “duty to warn” requirement before Mr. Khashoggi’s murder and on Saudi government repressive actions against dissidents within the U.S. including any Saudi government use of diplomatic facilities to carry out such actions.

            

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Those who say it can’t be done are usually interrupted by others doing it.”

James Baldwin

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