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MAJORITY WHIPLINE: TUESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2021

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Tuesday, August 24, 2021

House Meets at...

Votes Predicted at...

12:00 p.m. Legislative Business   
Five "One Minutes" per side            

First Votes: 2:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.       
Last Votes: ???               
    

 

ANY ANTICIPATED MEMBER ABSENCES FOR VOTES TODAY SHOULD BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY TO THE OFFICE OF THE MAJORITY WHIP AT 6-3210.


Floor Schedule and Procedure:

H.Res. __ – Rule Providing for Consideration of S.Con.Res. 14Setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2022 and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2023 through 2031 (Sen. Sanders – Budget), H.R. 4 John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act of 2021 (Rep. Sewell – Judiciary), and Senate Amendment to H.R. 3684Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (Rep. DeFazio – Transportation and Infrastructure)

H.R. 4John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act of 2021 (Rep. Sewell – Judiciary)

The right to vote is under attack in states across the country, and harmful Supreme Court decisions have removed critical protections.  According to a July 22 Brennan Center for Justice report, as of July 14, 2021, 18 states had enacted 30 laws that restrict the right to vote since the beginning of this year, including Georgia’s omnibus voter-suppression law, S.B. 202.  As of August 9, the non-partisan organization Voting Rights Lab was tracking 473 anti-voter bills in the states. 

 

Over the course of 13 hearings in two Congresses, including six just this year, the House Judiciary Committee has built a substantial record demonstrating the continuing and current need for preclearance.  The record shows that in the absence of preclearance, states have swiftly passed an evolving series of voter suppression laws, including many state and local jurisdictions that had previously been subject to preclearance pre-Shelby County, that continue to undermine minority voting rights.  Though many of these discriminatory laws were ultimately overturned after lengthy litigation, they were in place for many election cycles, leaving minority voters without a remedy for the harms suffered during that period.  H.R. 4 would restore the preclearance process and shift the burden back to states with a history of voting discrimination. The Committee on House Administration Subcommittee on Elections recently released a report entitled “Voting in America: Ensuring Free and Fair Access to the Ballot,” which found “conclusively that discrimination in voting does, in fact, still exist” and “has grown steadily” in recent years. 

 

The bill that will be on the floor next week is an updated and strengthened version of H.R. 4 from the 116th Congress, which passed the House in December 2019 with unanimous Democratic support.  In accordance with Chief Justice Roberts’s opinion in Shelby County v. Holder, this legislation establishes a coverage formula that uses updated voting rights violations to determine which jurisdictions are required to submit voting changes to the Justice Department for pre-clearance before they can go into effect.  The bill also includes a 50 states practice-based coverage provision that applies to tactics that have often been used to discriminate against minority voters.  The legislation has also been updated to respond to the recent Brnovich v. DNC decision to ensure that plaintiffs have a fair opportunity to challenge already-implemented voting rules that result in discrimination based on race, color, or language-minority status.

 

Responding to challenges laid down by the Supreme Court and recent anti-democratic laws passed throughout the country, H.R. 4 provides a path to block voting changes that make minority voters worse off, which have been enacted but not yet implemented, and further restores the standards for Section 2 claims against practices that result in the denial or abridgement of the right to vote. This critical legislation contains several other key provisions to protect the right to vote. 

 

Click here for bill text.

 

Click here for a one-pager from the Judiciary Committee.

Possible Passage of Postponed Suspensions (10 votes)

1. S. 848 – Consider Teachers Act of 2021 (Sen. Braun – Education and Labor)

This bill would codify Department of Education (ED) regulations to improve the administration of the TEACH Grant program.  These changes will help reduce the amount of grants that convert to loans by creating an appeal process for erroneously converted grants and providing better counseling to students.  The bill also requires ED to extend the service window for current recipients by 3 years to ensure that individuals can complete their service during the pandemic

2. S. 1828 – HAVANA Act of 2021 (Sen. Collins – Foreign Affairs)

The bill amends the Central Intelligence Agency Act of 1949 to authorize payment to personnel of the CIA who incur qualifying injuries to the brain, and authorizes payment to personnel of the Department of State who incur similar injuries.

3. H.R. 1029 – Free Veterans from Fees Act (Rep. Steube – Natural Resources)

This bill waives special use permit application fees for special events at war memorials on land administered by the National Park Service in Washington, D.C., and its environs when a majority of attendees are veterans or Gold Star Families.

4. H.R. 1154 – Great Dismal Swamp National Heritage Area Act (Rep. McEachin – Natural Resources)

This bill authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study to assess the suitability and feasibility of designating certain land as the Great Dismal Swamp National Heritage Area.

5. H.R. 3533 – To establish occupational series for Federal positions in software development, software engineering, data science, and data management, and for other purposes, as amended (Rep. Obernolte – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would require the Office of Personnel Management to update or establish occupational series for federal government positions in software development, software engineering, data science, and data management within 270 days of enactment.

6. H.R. 3599 – Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. Khanna – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would establish a personnel rotation program for cybersecurity professionals at federal agencies.  OPM would issue an operational plan providing policies, processes, and procedures for the program, and GAO would report on agency and employee participation in the program.

7. H.R. 1204 – District of Columbia Chief Financial Officer Salary Home Rule Act, as amended (Rep. Norton – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would give the District of Columbia the authority to pass a law to increase the pay of its Chief Financial Officer (CFO) above the existing statutory allowable pay for the CFO

8. H.R. 978 – Chai Suthammanont Remembrance Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. Connolly – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would require federal agencies to create evidence-based reentry plans for employees required to return to federal offices after a public health emergency  The bill would require agency officials to develop and make public the requirements and specifications for how the government would protect the health and safety of federal employees while continuing operations and providing vital services to the public

9. H.R. 2617 – Performance Enhancement Reform Act, as amended (Rep. Connolly – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would require agencies’ chief performance officers to work in consultation with the chief human capital officer, the chief information officer, the chief data officer, and the chief financial officer to prepare the annual performance plans required of each agency by law.

10. S. 2382To authorize the National Cyber Director to accept details from other elements of the Federal Government on nonreimbursable basis, and for other purposes (Sen. Portman – Oversight and Reform)

This bill would allow the National Cyber Director to accept details from other elements of the federal government on a non-reimbursable basis

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

"Courage is grace under pressure"

-Ernest Hemingway

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