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Home » Majority Whipline » MAJORITY WHIPLINE: MONDAY, JUNE 28, 2021

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MAJORITY WHIPLINE: MONDAY, JUNE 28, 2021

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House Meets at… Votes Predicted at…
12:00 p.m. Morning Hour
2:00 p.m. Legislative Business
Fifteen “One Minutes” per side
First/Last Votes: 6:30 p.m.

 

ANY ANTICIPATED MEMBER ABSENCES FOR VOTES TODAY SHOULD BE REPORTED IMMEDIATELY TO THE OFFICE OF THE MAJORITY WHIP AT 6-3210.

Floor Schedule and Procedure:

Suspensions (11 bills)

1. H.R. 3261 – To repeal the Authorization for the Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution (Rep. Spanberger – Foreign Affairs)

This bill repeals the 1991 AUMF that authorized the Gulf War.

2. H.R. 3283 – To repeal the joint resolution entitled, “A joint resolution to promote peace and stability in the Middle East”, as amended (Rep. Meijer – Foreign Affairs)

This bill repeals a never-invoked authorization for force and assistance in the Middle East signed into law in 1957.

3. H.R. 567 – Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership Program Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. McCaul – Foreign Affairs)

This bill authorizes the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership Program and requires the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the Administrator of USAID, to submit a comprehensive, interagency strategy, a plan to monitor and evaluate TSCTP programs and identify the key indicators that will be used to measure performance and progress under the strategy.

4. H.Res. 186 – Calling for the immediate release of Trevor Reed, a United States citizen who was unjustly found guilty and sentenced to nine years in a Russian prison (Rep. Pfluger – Foreign Affairs)

This resolution calls for the immediate release of Trevor Reed, a U.S. citizen convicted on July 30, 2020, of trumped up charges in Russia and sentenced to nine years in a Russian prison camp. It expresses support for all unjustly detained prisoners in Russia, condemns the practice of politically motivated imprisonment, and urges U.S. officials to raise the case during all interactions with the Russian government.

5. H.R. 2471 – Haiti Development, Accountability, and Institutional Transparency Initiative Act, as amended (Rep. Jeffries – Foreign Affairs)

This bill requires the State Department to provide: 1) an assessment of the La Saline Massacre that took place on November 13, 2018; and 2) an all-encompassing report that includes strategies and assessments of State Department, USAID initiatives and partnerships with the Haitian government on human rights, freedom of the press and assembly, and anti-corruption efforts, as well as actions to support post-earthquake and post-hurricane recovery and development.

6. H.R. 1500 – Global Learning Loss Assessment Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. Houlahan – Foreign Affairs)

The bill would require a report on the impact of COVID-19 on USAID basic education programs, including the magnitude of global learning loss that will result from protracted school closures; descriptions of forms of distance learning in low resource contexts; an analysis of how school closures affect marginalized children; data on Agency programs being carried out to continue learning during the pandemic; and a description of the authorities and resources USAID needs to support education programs during and after the pandemic that will mitigate learning loss and help students get back on track.

7. H.Res. 402 – Urging the Administration to facilitate assistance in response to the devasting impacts of COVID-19 in India, as amended (Rep. Sherman – Foreign Affairs)

This resolution recognizes the devastating impact of COVID–19 in India, urges the Administration to facilitate assistance to India and neighboring countries, and recognizes the help from Indian Americans and U.S. firms and calls on their continued efforts.

8. H.R. 391 – Global Health Security Act of 2021, as amended (Rep. Connolly – Foreign Affairs)

This legislation requires the President to establish a U.S. Global Health Security Coordinator. The bill also establishes an interagency review council to ensure global health security preparedness activities are coordinated and prioritized across the federal government, and requires a global health security strategy to Congress. Finally, the legislation outlines the framework for a funding mechanism comparable to the Global Fund, to leverage other donor funding to support global health security activities.

9. H.R. 2225 – National Science Foundation for the Future Act, as amended (Rep. Johnson (TX) – Science, Space, and Technology)

The purpose of the bill is to authorize funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal years (FY) 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025 and 2026, to provide policy and programmatic direction related to science and engineering research supported by the Foundation, STEM education and broadening participation activities, research infrastructure, and to establish a new Directorate for Science and Engineering Solutions.

10. H.R. 3593 – Department of Energy Science for the Future Act, as amended (Rep. Johnson (TX) – Science, Space, and Technology)

The purpose of the bill is to amend the Department of Energy Organization Act, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the Department of Energy Research and Innovation Act, the National Quantum Initiative Act, and the Department of Energy Science Education Enhancement Act to provide guidance for and investment in the research and development activities of the Department of Energy Office of Science, and for other purposes.

11. H.R. 3385 – The HOPE for Afghan SIVs Act, as amended (Rep. Crow – Judiciary)

This bill would provide the Secretary of State and Secretary of Homeland Security the authority to expedite the issuance of special immigrant visas (SIVs) for Afghan translators and contractors who assisted the U.S. government by allowing these individuals to complete the requisite medical examination after they enter the United States.  SIV recipients would be admitted to the United States as conditional permanent residents until such time that the medical examination is completed, and the Secretary of Homeland Security determines that they are not inadmissible on health-related grounds.  The bill requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to consult with the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish procedures to ensure, to the greatest extent practicable, that medical examinations are completed within 30 days of admission.

 
QUOTE OF THE DAY:

 

“The point is not to pay back kindness but to pass it on.”

-Julia Alvarez

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